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international problem city was not part of the larger part. >> may have some into that equates one of the oddities of the white paper and i think it's a very ripe area to follow-up is exactly what work the word imminent is doing. it's not clear from reading the white paper whether the word imminent is in his tent to get over domestic constitutional hurdles, whether it comes to international law or whether it is an attempt to get around domestic criminal prohibitions as an affirmative defense in criminal prohibitions or whether it flows and some other neat. it's simply there is an apparently self-imposed complain and it's not clear what legal problem it's designed to solve. some of the questions you asked would be different depending what were the word imminent is doing. i talk about this in my written statement, but it's an area with this committee pushing the administration's clarification. >> thank you and a thank you, mr. chairman. >> the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. komar for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. this is an exceedingly tough it. we appreci
because it's indiscriminant killing, and in the old days you throw a rock over the wall of the city and you didn't see who you killed, and that's like nuclear weapons. if they used catapults then, today would be nuclear weapons. there's various arguments in that, and people tend to say, oh, that's just religion. people are rational. that's not quite true. religious lines in the middle east are critical. i think that once iran goes nuclear, we're going to have a severe sunni-shiite play, and it's seen as a shiite's bomb threatening the sunni dominance in the middle east. we will probably see very close to that, a pakistani nuclear presence, an extended, and pakistan nigh extended tee -- deterrents in saudi arabia. they financed the nuclear program. they have prior agreement with them that if saudi arabia calls for it, they will provide them with nuclear weapons. i doubt that pakistanis will just deliver a bomb. they would probably station elements in the region, and this is going to raise the question regarding, for the first time, second strike capability against india which would c
for your police force for all of philadelphia. but in reality, if you can't cover the city and you can do a lot of things, the one s.w.a.t. team can never be decisive. that is where we found ourselves the begin with a significant evolution and it began to change dramatically. >> in somalia, the task force ranger had be been there a month or two before the big battle that i wrote about. during that time, they had launched six missions. so the pace was intelligence gathering, finding targets, planning and operations, sometimes very quickly. once that intelligence came together, then launching it. described what a temporal up-tempo means and how that applied in iraq? >> that's exactly right. there were eight series of these that happened a number of days apart. so you gather intel, you get it together, you make a decision. you set yourself criteria to launch when the criteria are there. but it's a pretty centralized, deliberate process. we were originally doing that, and we would have this precise thing. what we found is that we were having a very narrow slow effect. we would capture all tho
and cities and i don't remember wisconsin but i know for single women it's anywhere from 19,000 to 29,000 that's just minimal, all of those things that are absolutely necessary. so i think everyone says -- i work with a lot of organizations and everyone will say well, that we need one-on-one especially for like the latino groups and we need one-on-one for everyone really. that is what everybody wants and you sort of know that from your research as well. i think what is really important is senior centers and places where people can actually come for help. finra has this great project on libraries and there are that many of them. i think there are 25 they funded. i've been to a number of them doing programs with them. they are incredible. so there ways that we could do this but there is no coordination, no reach nationally except through these little programs that the national council on aging does a great initiative as well. so i don't know what will happen after this administration. >> thank you. >> senator franken. >> thank you. this topic brings up so many -- so many subjects about
to owning my own business and joined the state legislature in california for six years. been on the city council for ten of los angeles and now i'm a member of congress as of january of this year. >> what did the president say that resonated with you tonight? >> what i like the most about what he said when it came to immigration reform, he basically said let's get this done now. i think we have a window of opportunity of bipartisan cooperation for republicans and democrats by large agree we need to do something. let's hope we can work on the -- working on out of the senate and in our house and get something comprehensive to the president right away. >> what was the experience like for you tonight? what time can -- did you go to the chamber to get our seat? >> about an hour and a half early. i got seat close enough to aisle i was able to shake his hand and say thank you, mr. mr. president before he went to the podium to make the speech. >> do the republicans have a chance of working the immigration issue positively? >> i think they do. i looked toward the republican side of the room, we
economic growth, while contributing to america's energy independence. for instance, the los angeles city council approved a 25 year $1.5 billion project to buy a solar power produced at the indian nation in the southern nevada desert. when it goes online in 2016, it will be the largest solar power plant on tribal land. capturing race to power over 118,000 los angeles homes. in addition to the plan itself, over 900,000 solar panels will be built on a reservation, creating more jobs in industries that tomorrow. one way to ensure projects like this is to promote fair, equitable tax policy. like all government, tribes must collect and manage their own taxes. right now, tribal governments don't have the same taxing authority by states. a flock of governments, we will continue working with federal partners to fix these policies have the economies grow and become a source of strength and her family of nations. sovereignty is how we secure communities and how they can secure nations and how we will secure future. this is our greatest challenge. a quarter of people in poverty, traced the national
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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